Part of the Solution

Idealistic musings about eDiscovery

Category Archives: Uncategorized

Jack Halprin

We lost Jack Halprin yesterday. Greg Buckles has a great tribute to Jack on his site, but I want to add a couple of words of my own.

When I applied to join Autonomy in 2010, the company was not looking for an eDiscovery expert. Because I presented myself as one, however, the Powers That Were asked their VP of eDiscovery and Compliance – a well-established eDiscovery expert – to evaluate my candidacy. Yep, it was Jack.

Knowing I was from Houston, Jack called his friend Greg to check me out. Fortunately, Greg and I had met socially a few times and the feedback was positive. So positive, in fact, that I was able to collaborate on a couple of projects with Jack before he left for his dream job at Google. I was never privileged to meet Jack in person, but we spent plenty of time on the phone with each other.

Jack died of cancer Thursday morning. He was 46. As Greg wrote:

If you are up to it, raise Jack’s favorite Jägermeister shot in remembrance. If you really do remember what that tastes like from your college days, try a memorial donation to Lymphoma Research Foundation or Larkin Street Youth Services in Jack’s name.
Thanks for your support, Jack. We’ll miss you.
Advertisements

Can You Be a “Salesman” and Still Be Part of the Solution?

I had a job interview by telephone last week. The position’s job posting read as though it had been lifted from my career bucket list; everything I want my career to be, and all the experience I have obtained, meshed perfectly with the contents of the job description.

I knew, however, that there might be more here than meets the eye when, upon initial contact, the reviewer mentioned that in addition to everything listed on the job posting, this would be “a true sales position”. I love to evangelize and identify solutions. I HATE to “sell”.

I thought the interview went fairly well (at least, for purposes of demonstrating my expertise). The interviewer disagreed; he even told me so during the call, saying that he didn’t hear me steering the conversation forcefully enough to specific solutions that could be presented. (Never mind the fact that the list of solutions this company represents is outdated and incomplete on their website, so I wasn’t sure what to recommend. The message was clear: I wasn’t SELLING hard enough.)

This brings me to a recent post on LinkedIn by Damian A. Durrant of Catalyst, entitled “More solving, less ‘selling'”. He believes as I do: don’t sell, SOLVE.

Sales is push, it says I am ramming something, anything, down your throat lubricated with lunch whether you need it or not. Unpleasant. Consulting is pull, it says I believe I have something that will help you, let’s talk about it. Better.

I have been a salesman. I have been a consultant. I much prefer the latter, as I am working to provide solutions. A salesman will make his numbers for the month. A solution provider will be someone the client goes back to again and again, because the provider makes the client’s job easier and less expensive. It’s the difference between making a one-time sale, and building a true relationship.

The e-discovery industry needs to shed itself of its copying and scanning “salesy” origins and start behaving more like the advisory firms, albeit more creatively, more nimbly and without the hefty billing rates.

Nicely said, Damian. Nicely said indeed.

I highly recommend you read his message.

The Terminal Legal Hold: Pippins v. KPMG

I came up with the term “terminal legal hold” to describe the situation faced by an enterprise which can’t bring itself to delete obsolete data, lest any of that data be potentially responsive in future litigation and the organization’s document destruction policy couldn’t pass the Zubulake v. UBS Warburg “systematic and repeatable” test. The enterprise fears sanctions so greatly that they never delete anything. For obvious reasons, this isn’t a best practice.

A New York federal court, however, has now tacitly approved of — indeed, ordered — the “terminal legal hold”.

Pippins v. KPMG is being litigated before Magistrate Judge James L. Cott, in the Southern District of New York. KPMG is being sued by two as-yet-uncertified classes of audit associates who claim that they were misclassified as exempt employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act, and therefore are owed overtime pay. There are as many as 9,000 potential class members, and thus as many as 9,000 hard drives which they may have used. Counsel for the two parties could not agree on the sampling criteria or the number of drives to include in the sample. KPMG asserted that the cost to preserve the more than 2,500 drives currently in its possession was more than $1.5 million, and proposed that for the sake of proportionality, one hundred randomly-selected hard drives should be preserved as the sample set.

On October 11, Judge Cott ruled that KPMG has to preserve the hard drive of every potential class member. Because the district judge had not yet ruled on class certification, every auditor was a potential plaintiff and therefore a “key player” as defined in Zubulake v. UBS Warburg. “With so many unknowns involved at this stage in the litigation,” Judge Cott wrote, “permitting KPMG to destroy the hard drives is simply not appropriate at this time.”

KPMG filed an objection brief to the district judge on October 28, writing, “The ‘key player’ analysis has never been extended to require the preservation of ESI of every potential member of a putative class or proposed FLSA collective action.” Also:

[N]ever has it been held that an employer on notice of a putative class action or proposed collective must impose a ‘litigation hold’ and preserve ESI (among other materials) for every current or former employee who theoretically could bring an individual action in the future. If companies were required to retain documents whenever there is a mere possibility that they could be sued, they effectively would face a perpetual duty to preserve and thus would be unable to implement document-retention policies.

In other words: a terminal legal hold. Leonard Deutchman referred to this today as “the perfect e-discovery storm”:

At virtually the earliest moment in the litigation, the plaintiffs require the defendant to spend a remarkable amount of money simply on preservation — the cost to search, review and produce e-discovery has not yet even been discussed. … If the legal claims are insufficient or the class uncertifiable, millions will have been wasted in preservation; if, however, the allegations are shown to be strong and the class intact but the drives are not preserved, the defendant may then have been allowed to destroy, or let be destroyed, the mythical smoking gun ESI. Because the cost of preservation is so high, the issue of cost has arisen earlier than it usually does (when calculating the costs of processing, searching and production) — so early that neither side has the facts to support its position. Thus, the potential for gross injustice lies in taking either position.

This led to the filing of an amicus brief by the United States Chamber of Commerce on November 8, arguing that the magistrate judge got it wrong. “’Key players’ … could not, and does not, embrace every member of a putative class of thousands. … Put bluntly: no absent member of a properly certified class or non-party to a properly certified collective action should be a ‘key player.'”

Judge Cott may have gotten the “key player” analysis wrong, but Deutchman argues that the judge otherwise made the right call:

As a legal matter, and as a way of governing e-discovery practice, the court was wise to enforce the rules as they are by denying both sides’ motions, advising the defendant to allow the plaintiffs to examine the sample drives and letting the parties then act in their enlightened self-interest. In so doing, the court instructs those who follow to act as the defendant should have rather than as it did. Cooperation generally works when the parties act in their enlightened self-interest. By interpreting the rules properly, the court “enlightened” the defendant as to what its self-interest truly was. Presumably it, and those reading the opinion, will now know how to act.

My take on this: Judges are typically referees, and should not take it upon themselves to rescue parties from their own mistakes. However, every rule has an exception, and this strikes me as a valid one.

KPMG said the cost of preserving each hard drive would cost them $600; multiply by 9,000 hard drives, and they will have spent $5.4 million before processing a single file. Even if KPMG should have made stronger efforts at cooperation with respect to sampling of the preserved hard drives (and, in my opinion, they should have), Judge Cott’s decision sets a dangerous precedent in favor of dilatory plaintiffs who would rather win their case through expense and attrition than on the merits.

While as a commentator I’d like to be less cynical and believe that most plaintiffs want their cases litigated fairly, my experience as a defense litigator has taught me otherwise. If a savvy plaintiff’s lawyer sees an opportunity to make a case so expensive for the defendant that the defendant will gladly settle, regardless of culpability, the lawyer will gladly do so. The higher the potential expense, the greater will be the amount of the settlement. If Judge Cott’s order is allowed to stand, the mere threat of class certification would be enough to cause large defendants to reach for their checkbooks rather than begin the expensive task of preserving hard drives that might contain evidence that might be of use in some unspecified, unfiled, and unthreatened future litigation. The net result? Cases won’t be tried on the merits, and no enterprise will delete anything ever again.

I would have preferred Judge Cott force the parties to agree on a sampling protocol, appointing a special master if need be, and allowing KPMG to manage its own preservation of hard drives upon pain of sanctions if they mess it up (the cost of which , in all likelihood, would be far less than the cost of preserving all 9,000 hard drives).

(Update 1/9/12: Law.com’s Evan Koblentz reports this morning that the parties may reach a resolution on this issue.)